Physical Education

Biography

Physical Education Instructor

JK-7 M-W-F

Coach A has had a passion and determination to coach and teach various sports/PE programs for the past 20 years.  Development in a child through sports and activities is something he found a strong passion for early on.

He attended South Puget Sound C.C. and the University of Alaska, Fairbanks while studying Business Administration. Along with his education his personality will make an impact on ever child’s success.

Being able to coach and teach is a highlight of each day for Coach A. He strives to see children excel and celebrate their continued active and healthy lifestyles.

click links for:

Physical-Education-Brochure

PE Guidelines and Expectations

PE Uniform Flyer

 Upcoming Events

8/29-9/2 Presidential Fitness Pre-Testing

– September Homework-

PK-1st grade : 20 mins of continuous movement exercise daily

2nd grade : 4 push ups, 4 curl ups, 4 squats and 20 mins continuous movement exercise daily

3rd grade : 5 push ups 5 curl ups, 5 squats and 20 mins continuous movement exercise daily

4th grade : 7 push ups 7 curl ups, 7 squats and 20 mins continuous movement exercise daily

5th-8th grade : 10 push ups 10 sit ups, 10 squats and 20 mins continuous movement exercise daily

These numbers will increase each month throughout the school year.

* If the students feels pain in joints then exercise should be held back.  If a handicap or injury prevents the student to accomplish the homework alternative exercises will be assigned at the teachers discretion.

Physical Education

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Physical Education is designed to combine learning and enjoyment providing an environment that allows a child to engage in a wide variety of activities to ensure that students have the opportunity to achieve success. Activities are divided into short units of instruction to ensure all students will find some activity that they enjoy. Our program involves experiences that develop the mind and body, individual and group cooperation and sportsmanship, as well as emotional and spiritual growth which correspond with the goals of a Christian education.

It is recommended that developing children exercise 60 minutes each day. More is better. Parents should be exercising as well; 30 minutes 4-5 times/week. Looking forward to a great year.

Classroom rules and policies

Class Rules:

  1. Always listen when the teacher is talking with a quiet body and voice.
  2. When the whistle blows, freeze and wait for the next direction.
  3. Always be aware of what and who is around you.
  4. Use appropriate language and behavior.
  5. Play safe and have fun.

Grading Practices

Student’s are graded primarily on their level of participation and cooperation during class. Each class session is assigned a 10 point value. A student receives 5 points for their participation and another 5 for their cooperation.  Points will be subtracted based on a lack of these two requirements.

Physical Education Curriculum

All Children and youth need a well-planned physical education program that begins at the earliest grade levels, receives strong support school wide, is understood and reinforced at home, and is supported by a comprehensive healthy education program. All have the potential to achieve an active and healthy life-style. Every child and youth can develop appropriate skills, feel good about his or her body, and relate to others in a positive way.

General Content Standards

 Physical Education Standards:

  1. Motor Skills and Movement
  2. Movement Concepts and Skill Concepts
  3. Physical Fitness
  4. Physical Fitness Concepts and Principles
  5. Sportsmanship and Character Education

The first important aspect of physical education is the direct bearing it has on children’s physical, mental, emotional, spiritual, and social well being. All children must be given opportunities not only to succeed in physical education but also to develop a lifelong commitment to the pleasure and the health benefits of physical activity.

The second reason for the importance of physical education today is its direct link with academic learning. The healthy, physically active child is more likely to be academically motivated, alert, and successful.

A physically educated person will:

  • Demonstrates competency in many movement forms and proficiency in a few movement forms.
  • Applies movement concepts and principles to the learning and development of motor skills.
  • Exhibits a physically active lifestyle.
  • Achieves and maintains a healthy-enhancing level of physical fitness.
  • Demonstrates responsible personal and social behavior in physical activity settings.
  • Demonstrates understanding and respect for differences among people in physical activity settings.
  • Understands that physical activity provides opportunities for enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and social interaction.

JK/Kindergarten

Kindergarteners should be able to:

  • Demonstrate locomotor skills including walking, hopping, skipping, galloping, sliding, running, and jumping.
  • Demonstrate non-locomotor skills including balancing, bending and stretching, twisting and turning, pushing and pulling, rising and falling.
  • Demonstrate striking a stationary ball with any part of the body.
  • Identify parts of the body and their location.
  • Follow adult-delivered rules.
  • Recognize the concept of self and others.

First Grade
Students in First grade should be able to:

  • Demonstrate locomotor skills including walking, hopping, skipping, galloping, sliding, running, and jumping.
  • Demonstrate non-locomotor skills including balancing, bending and stretching, twisting and turning, pushing and pulling, rising and falling.
  • Manipulate objectives with purposeful movement; roll, toss, underhand, bounce with two hands, retrieve a stationary kick and strike with the hand various objects that are safe and non-threating.
  • Demonstrate tossing ball alone or with a partner.
  • Travel and change direction quickly in response to a signal.
  • Learn to use equipment safely and responsibly.
  • Develop responsibility for expected behavior in the gym and classroom.
  • Learn in groups but participate as individuals.

Second Grade
Students in the Second grade should be to:

  • Demonstrate locomotor skills including walking, hopping, skipping, galloping, sliding, running, and jumping.
  • Demonstrate non-locomotor skills including balancing, bending and stretching, twisting and turning, pushing and pulling, rising and falling.
  • Demonstrate catching a rolled ball, throwing and catching a ball after one bounce solo and with a partner and kicking a stationary ball in a variety of ways.
  • Demonstrate jumping over a self-turned rope repeatedly.
  • Throw a ball hard demonstrating overhand technique, a side orientation and opposition.
  • Celebrate the successes of others and begin to recognize specific activities that contribute to the feeling of joy.

Third Grade

Students in the Third grade should be to:

  • Demonstrate combining locomotor and non-locomotor movement skills, such as in non-traditional cooperative and non-cooperative games.
  • Dribble a ball continuously using the hands or feet to control it.
  • Maintain flexibility by stretching daily.
  • Develop sequences of skills that facilitate coordination in various games and activities.
  • Cooperate with others in group activities.
  • Accept the feelings resulting from challenge, success, and failure in games and activities.

Fourth Grade

Students in the Fourth grade should be to:

  • Demonstrate locomotor and non-locomotor movement skills to a high degree.
  • Manipulate a variety of objects in a number of ways.
  • Dribble a ball with hand in foot while moving.
  • Jump for height and distance.
  • Maintains continuous aerobic activity for specified amount of time.
  • Describe healthful benefits that result from regular participation in physical activity.
  • Recognize the fundamental strategies in simple games.
  • Cope with success and failure.
  • Recognize and accept the similarities and differences of others.
  • Follow rules while learning to cope with conflicts and disputes by practicing conflict resolution skills.

Fifth Grade
Students in the Fifth grade should be to:

  • Continue to improve motor performances and become more proficient in basic skills, such as running, jumping, and throwing.
  • Manipulate objects with accuracy and speed with a focus on targets.
  • Use fundamental strategies: offense and defense.
  • Recognize that different body types are more effective in certain movement skills and activities.
  • Participate in game like activities with an emphasis in two or more skills.
  • Appreciate individual differences within small group competition and cooperation.
  • Learn to establish goals and establish the practice techniques to most traditional games.

Sixth Grade
Students in the Sixth grade should be to:

  • Perform various skills in cooperative activities and lead up games developing the physical skills required for team, individual or dual organized sport.
  • Throw and catch a variety of objects demonstrating both accuracy and distance.
  • Demonstrate their improvement of eye-hand and eye-foot coordination.
  • Work together in cooperative groups learning to respect the performance of others regardless of their ability level.
  • Learn to provide positive feedback and support in skill execution.
  • Interacting positively with opponents in competitive activities to facilitate mutual development of skills and develop friendships.
  • Working toward a common goal to foster in each student a sense of acceptance and belonging and of being a valued member of the team or group.

Seventh Grade
Students in the Seventh grade should be to:

  • Introduce themselves to individual risk taking and individual sports rather than focus exclusively on team sports.
  • Enjoy taking on new challenges, solve new problems, and resolve conflicts between individuals and groups.
  • Identify proper warm-up, conditioning, and cooling-down techniques and the reasons for using them.
  • Demonstrate motor learning skills and understand that performance is measurable in terms of technique, accuracy, distance, and speed.
  • Accept and respect the decisions made by game officials-whether they are students, teachers, or officials outside of school.
  • Participate in vigorous activity for a sustained period of time while maintaining a target heart rate.

Eighth Grade
Students in the Seventh grade should be to:

  • Introduce themselves to individual risk taking and individual sports rather than focus exclusively on team sports.
  • Enjoy taking on new challenges, solve new problems, and resolve conflicts between individuals and groups.
  • Identify proper warm-up, conditioning, and cooling-down techniques and the reasons for using them.
  • Demonstrate motor learning skills and understand that performance is measurable in terms of technique, accuracy, distance, and speed.
  • Accept and respect the decisions made by game officials-whether they are students, teachers, or officials outside of school.
  • Participate in vigorous activity for a sustained period of time while maintaining a target heart rate.

Subscribe

Subscribe to our e-mail newsletter to receive updates.

Comments are closed.